A New Way to Flex It

Could cross-training provide the motivation and quick results you’re looking for?

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With the increasing popularity of home workout programs such as CrossFit, P90X, and Insanity, more and more beginners are turning to cross-training to shed excess pounds and gain muscle tone. But are these programs safe for the average Joe?

What Is Cross Training?

Many people use the term cross-training to refer to the practice of muscle confusion, which involves rapidly changing the stimulus to a muscle over a short period of time. However, cross-training can refer to any balanced workout regimen that involves aerobic activity, muscle strengthening, and flexibility exercises. If you’re new to the world of working out, beginning with an aggressive cross-training program such as P90X may cause more harm than good.

“I see many injuries in people who started cross-training activities without building up adequate strength and flexibility first,” says Mike Macko, P.T., D.P.T., O.C.S., M.T.C., P.E.S., physical therapy manager at Texas Health Ben Hogan Sports Medicine. “Before you start a cross-training program, be realistic about your fitness level and goals, and don’t be afraid to modify exercises to match your ability.”

To browse more than 250 exercise demonstration videos, visit TexasHealth.org/benhogan.

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